University of Florida
Error processing SSI file

Case Study IV – Bamboo in a Citrus Grove

 

Bambusa ventricosa, a species of bamboo suitable for windbreaks, was planted primarily in perimeter locations in this Indian River grove near Vero Beach. The bamboo windbreaks shown below were initiated using single-stemmed plants in citripots and were a little more than one year old in October 2006. Each windbreak consists of a single row of plants set about 5 feet apart. The clumps are presently about 8 high with some individual shoots that are 10 feet high after regular fertigation by microsprinkler.

The owner recognizes that bamboo is relatively expensive to use in windbreaks, but makes the reasonable suggestion that it might be possible to divide the clumps when they are young (< 1 year) and use those plants to establish windbreaks elsewhere.

Fig. 1. General view of young Bambusa ventricosa planted as a windbreak for citrus. Notice that the plants are well branched from the ground to the top.

Fig. 1. General view of young Bambusa ventricosa planted as a windbreak for citrus. Notice that the plants are well branched from the ground to the top.

Fig. 2. Branching habit of Bambusa ventricosa. Notice the long slender culms (stems) and the excellent branching.

Fig. 2. Branching habit of Bambusa ventricosa. Notice the long slender culms (stems) and the excellent branching.

Fig. 3. Culm development and spread of the bamboo about one year after planting a single stemmed plant.

Fig. 3. Culm development and spread of the bamboo about one year after planting a single stemmed plant.

Fig. 4. An end view of Bambusa ventricosa plants about one year after planting as a windbreak around citrus.

Fig. 4. An end view of Bambusa ventricosa plants about one year after planting as a windbreak around citrus.

Fig. 5. Bambusa ventricosa in a windbreak around citrus.

Fig. 5. Bambusa ventricosa in a windbreak around citrus.

 

Error processing SSI file